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Effective Tax Burden on Highly Qualified Employers, The: An International Comparison

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager;

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No detectada 2005 SpringerLink

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Executive Summary

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 1-6

Aim of the Study

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 7-8

The Methodology

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 9-26

Description of Tax and Social Security Systems

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 27-53

The Effective Tax Burden in the Analysed Countries

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 55-68

International and Inter-Regional Comparison

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 69-81

The Importance of Social Security

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 83-86

Summary and Conclusions

Christina Elschner; Robert Schwager

Four hundred and fifty million people suffer from a mental or behavioral disorder, yet only a small minority of them receive even the most basic treatment according to the World Health Organisation . 1,000,000 people die as a result of the act of suicide each year, and every year across the world ). This problem permeates all aspects and levels of our world civilizations despite the increased interconnectedness of our peoples and the evolution of mans’ knowledge and abilities over the last century. Such evidence directs a number of key phenomenological questions within the seventh moment. Within the quest of humanity to be, how do humans survive, exist and be within a mental or behavioural disorder? Within the act of looking outwards to the modern world for possible answers and explanations, that very global world seeps inwards and captures our being. But within that duality, interpretation and understanding, the evidence suggests that many humans find aspects to that answer that may indicate an apparent meaningless being. This question prompts the phenomenological question, What is the nature and meaning of mental health and mental distress in the world of today? And I ask whether philosophers have abandoned this search to the detriment of humanity and therein neglected to question the boundaries and limits of the actuality and potentiality of being? Answering these questions is the key vocation and responsibility of philosophy and the core of the project of phenomenology and in particular phenomenology in the health sciences. Looking and reflecting inwards on being, requires us to examine how the world of the seventh moment impacts upon being. This paper examines these questions through phenomenological methods by returning to the roots of being, and questions theory of being, through an alternative integration or convolution of ontological and teleological schema, the Trialectic.

Pp. 87-88

Información

Tipo: libros

ISBN impreso

978-3-7908-1568-9

ISBN electrónico

978-3-7908-1623-5

Editor responsable

Springer Nature

País de edición

Reino Unido

Fecha de publicación